Dental & Migraine Connection

Dental & Migraine Connection

Dental & Migraine Connection

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Dental & Migraine Connection
Dental & Migraine Connection

Conventional medicine still does not know what causes migraine headaches. Various theories exist which focus on blood flow irregularities, dilation of blood vessels, psychological and chemical changes, hormonal, toxicity and heavy metals, etc and triggers bright light, smells, foods, low blood sugar, weather changes, aspartame and other additives. One factor often overlooked by the medical establishment is structural distortions stemming from cranial dental imbalances.

Many of the symptoms plaguing migraine patients have their origin from stimulation of the autonomic nervous system (ANS). The ANS primarily deals with the peripheral parts of the body as opposed to the central nervous system (CNS), which monitors the brain and spinal cord transmissions. An increased heart rate results from activation of the sympathetic nervous system. Eating stimulates the parasympathetic system, which works to aid digestion by stimulating release of digestive enzymes. The two components work to counter balance each other. The parasympathetic nervous system monitors the skull and pelvic regions where as the sympathetics deals with the thoracolumbar part of the spine. If the cranial bones and sutures expansion and contraction of joints between skull bones are distorted then changes in pressure from weather fronts or ascending and descending in an airplane can trigger off nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and migraine pain.

The key to diagnosing dental cranial distortions lies in the use of four indicators to palpate the skull and determine whether or not teeth contact worsen the cranial strain patterns. If teeth contact does increase the existing skull distortion, then a high probability exists that this factor is a major cause for migraine headaches